The work comes from the Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Senigallia and arrived at the Gallery in 1917. Many scholars consider it a gift from Federico da Montefeltro for the marriage of his daughter Giovanna to the Lord of Senigallia, Giovanni Della Rovere. Piero della Francesca’s execution is dated to 1474, the year of the formal marriage, or 1478, the actual year of the wedding.

The painting, in an intimate tone, resembles the larger Pala di San Bernardino by the same master, depicting the Madonna, the blessing Child, and two angels in adoration, dressed in simple and refined garments.

The figures, hieratic and monumental, are placed in a domestic setting created by a diffuse and subtle light. The interest in light, evident in the dust-like sunbeam in the small room on the second floor, shows Piero’s affinity with Flemish masters, who were also present in the Urbino court. From them, he learned the use of oil paint and visual techniques that allowed him to enhance the three-dimensionality of volumes. At the same time, Piero achieves a high formal synthesis that recalls the abstract and solemn architecture of Federico’s Palace.

Many elements, such as the ray of light entering through the closed window, the white rose in the hand of Jesus, the coral necklace he is wearing, and the objects painted in the niche on the left, allude to enigmatic symbolisms derived from the Christian tradition.

Author: Piero della Francesca
Realization date: eighth decade of the fifteenth century.
Storage location: Urbino, Galleria Nazionale delle Marche
Place of originChurch of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Senigallia
Technique: Oil on panel

Author: Piero della Francesca
Realization date: eighth decade of the fifteenth century.
Storage location: Urbino, Galleria Nazionale delle Marche
Place of originChurch of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Senigallia
Technique: Oil on panel


The work comes from the Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Senigallia and arrived at the Gallery in 1917. Many scholars consider it a gift from Federico da Montefeltro for the marriage of his daughter Giovanna to the Lord of Senigallia, Giovanni Della Rovere. Piero della Francesca’s execution is dated to 1474, the year of the formal marriage, or 1478, the actual year of the wedding.

The painting, in an intimate tone, resembles the larger Pala di San Bernardino by the same master, depicting the Madonna, the blessing Child, and two angels in adoration, dressed in simple and refined garments.

The figures, hieratic and monumental, are placed in a domestic setting created by a diffuse and subtle light. The interest in light, evident in the dust-like sunbeam in the small room on the second floor, shows Piero’s affinity with Flemish masters, who were also present in the Urbino court. From them, he learned the use of oil paint and visual techniques that allowed him to enhance the three-dimensionality of volumes. At the same time, Piero achieves a high formal synthesis that recalls the abstract and solemn architecture of Federico’s Palace.

Many elements, such as the ray of light entering through the closed window, the white rose in the hand of Jesus, the coral necklace he is wearing, and the objects painted in the niche on the left, allude to enigmatic symbolisms derived from the Christian tradition.