The triptych, initially in the Corsini collection in Florence, passed to Baroness Giuliana Ricasoli in 1926 and then, in 1963, to the Cini collection. In 1987, the Italian state purchased it for the Galleria Nazionale delle Marche from Countess Ylda Guglielmi Cini of Rome. The three panels arrived at the Urbino museum, poorly amputated of their terminal cusps, set within a rectangular frame, like a horizontal altarpiece, and surrounded by dark green velvet.

There is no information about the original location of the work, although the presence of Saints Benedict and Romuald might suggest it was painted for a Camaldolese monastery or community.

In 1947, Richard Offner attributed the painting to a follower of the painter he referred to as the “Maestro della pala d’altare di Fabriano,” in reference to the panel with Saint Anthony Abbot and Devotees, dated 1353, now in the Pinacoteca civica of Fabriano. In 1959, the “Maestro della pala d’altare di Fabriano” was identified by Roberto Longhi as Puccio di Simone, and in 1975, Richard Fremantle attributed the Urbino triptych to him as well.

The artist, who was active in Florence and trained in the workshop of Bernardo Daddi, moved to the Marche region following Allegretto Nuzi, probably staying there until 1357. Besides painting the 1353 panel in Fabriano, he left a triptych, now at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, depicting the Madonna and Child Enthroned with Saints, dated 1354, executed in collaboration with Allegretto. In the works created in Fabriano, Puccio’s style evolved in a more distinctly Gothic direction. The figures became more slender, the contrasts of light and shadow were softened, the folds of clothing modulated delicately, forming soft loops, and much more attention was paid to the creation of decorative motifs.

In the Urbino artwork, certainly produced after the Marche period, Puccio demonstrated an awareness of the Florentine style of the late 1350s, particularly that of the Nardo brothers and Andrea Orcagna. For instance, in Orcagna’s “Strozzi Altarpiece,” in the Strozzi Chapel in Santa Maria Novella in Florence, dated 1357, Puccio drew inspiration for the rhythmic pairs of saints depicted in the triptych’s lateral compartments. Similar to his other late-period works, the artist created figures outlined by continuous curves, eliminating all depth and working solely within the dimensions of height and width. This is especially evident in the central panel, where the Virgin and Child stand out primarily through their colors against the geometric-floral patterns in the background, which is also emphasized alongside the glitter of gold and enameled colors.

Author: Puccio di Simone
Realization date: 1357-1360 ca.
Storage location: Urbino, Galleria Nazionale delle Marche
INV COD:D 22
Dimensions: 108 × 56 cm (pannello centrale), 97 × 47 cm (pannelli laterali)
Technique: Panel

Author: Puccio di Simone
Realization date: 1357-1360 ca.
Storage location: Urbino, Galleria Nazionale delle Marche
INV COD:D 22
Dimensions: 108 × 56 cm (pannello centrale), 97 × 47 cm (pannelli laterali)
Technique: Panel


The triptych, initially in the Corsini collection in Florence, passed to Baroness Giuliana Ricasoli in 1926 and then, in 1963, to the Cini collection. In 1987, the Italian state purchased it for the Galleria Nazionale delle Marche from Countess Ylda Guglielmi Cini of Rome. The three panels arrived at the Urbino museum, poorly amputated of their terminal cusps, set within a rectangular frame, like a horizontal altarpiece, and surrounded by dark green velvet.

There is no information about the original location of the work, although the presence of Saints Benedict and Romuald might suggest it was painted for a Camaldolese monastery or community.

In 1947, Richard Offner attributed the painting to a follower of the painter he referred to as the “Maestro della pala d’altare di Fabriano,” in reference to the panel with Saint Anthony Abbot and Devotees, dated 1353, now in the Pinacoteca civica of Fabriano. In 1959, the “Maestro della pala d’altare di Fabriano” was identified by Roberto Longhi as Puccio di Simone, and in 1975, Richard Fremantle attributed the Urbino triptych to him as well.

The artist, who was active in Florence and trained in the workshop of Bernardo Daddi, moved to the Marche region following Allegretto Nuzi, probably staying there until 1357. Besides painting the 1353 panel in Fabriano, he left a triptych, now at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, depicting the Madonna and Child Enthroned with Saints, dated 1354, executed in collaboration with Allegretto. In the works created in Fabriano, Puccio’s style evolved in a more distinctly Gothic direction. The figures became more slender, the contrasts of light and shadow were softened, the folds of clothing modulated delicately, forming soft loops, and much more attention was paid to the creation of decorative motifs.

In the Urbino artwork, certainly produced after the Marche period, Puccio demonstrated an awareness of the Florentine style of the late 1350s, particularly that of the Nardo brothers and Andrea Orcagna. For instance, in Orcagna’s “Strozzi Altarpiece,” in the Strozzi Chapel in Santa Maria Novella in Florence, dated 1357, Puccio drew inspiration for the rhythmic pairs of saints depicted in the triptych’s lateral compartments. Similar to his other late-period works, the artist created figures outlined by continuous curves, eliminating all depth and working solely within the dimensions of height and width. This is especially evident in the central panel, where the Virgin and Child stand out primarily through their colors against the geometric-floral patterns in the background, which is also emphasized alongside the glitter of gold and enameled colors.